ALL ART IS CONTEMPORARY #2

ALL ART IS CONTEMPORARY #2

So let’s test a novice of contemporary art. Let’s put him in front of a minimalist work of art, such as National #1
of Robert Ryman. An American artist known to have conceived the majority of his works as a completely white
(or blank) canvas. How could a novice of art, a visitor of his first museum or a simple tourist think that’s art?
And how could he accept the fact that no, he absolutely cannot reproduce the work of art neither to a visual extent nor to a merely conceptual extent?

A random tourist visiting London, who runs across Marc Quinn’s Toxic Sublime exhibition, can’t do anything but feel astounded and bewildered by those extraordinarily complex metal sculptures, painted with materials such as human blood, sand or ice.

Constructs that, to an inattentive or a poorly trained eye, seem just like sheets of paper curled up and then unfurled. On one side, Ryman depicts the moments before the creation of a work of art: the anxiety, the void,
the apprehension… the whiteness of it. Quinn symbolizes a serie of atavic dualisms concerning human life.
Both sublimate(d) brilliantly their philosophy… are you so sure that you could do the same?

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