Giulio D’Anna

Giulio D’Anna

Giulio D’Anna was an Italian painter famous for his aeropittura style, which refers to a branch of futurism present in the years following the First World War.

His life was mainly articulated in Messina, where he moved with his older brother at the end of the First World War. He always maintains contact with Palermo from Messina, when he fully dedicates himself to painting, seeing in the capital of the island the most lively and dynamic center in the field of figurative arts, especially with the presence of the first generation of Sicilian futurists: Vittorio Corona, Pippo Rizzo and Antonino Varvaro, points of reference for his artistic activity and that of the very young Renato Guttuso, whom he met at the end of the 1920s. In 1931 D’Anna landed in his first solo show at the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele III. The exhibition was visited by Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, who expressing his total favor with regard to the exhibited production, encouraged the artist to take part in the main national Futurist exhibitions. He was the first Messina painter to exhibit at the 19th Venice Biennale in 1934 and at the 2nd Rome Quadrennial the following year [1], also recording the first prize among young artists at the Colonial Art Exhibition in Paris with the painting Futurist reader. However, he did not abandon the activity in the family bookshop, which in fact became a cultural center of Messina. Aeropainting is a declination of futurism. As an expression of the myth of the machine and of modernity characteristic of the Marinettian movement, aeropainting manifests the enthusiasm for flight, the dynamism and speed of the airplane. The aeropictorical choice also responds to an autobiographical need of D’Anna, immediately revealing itself as a need for escape and aspiration to those journeys that he can only make with his imagination, without direct experience of flight. Giulio D’Anna is present in many international museums and is beaten by the most important auction houses in the world.

WORKS AVAILABLE: